Top
Home
»
VTech Baby
»
Play & Chase Puppy
12-36
MONTHS

Play & Chase Puppy

Developmental Benefits

Language Development
Language Development
Motor Skills
Motor Skills
Word Building
Word Building

Developmental Benefits

Play & Chase Puppy

Language Development
  • Introduces the alphabet, letter sounds and vocabulary.
  • Babies start to babble at an early age and this can be seen as the first signs of language. They are predisposed to pick up the sounds of the language that they hear around them. Adults can facilitate babies’ language development by playing with them, focussing on particular toys, reading books and naming everyday objects. The more babies are exposed to language the faster they will begin to pick up it up. There are social skills involved in language acquisition such as realising that it is necessary to wait until the other person has finished speaking. Babies begin to learn about conversational turn-taking from an early age; if a baby is babbling the adult waits for a pause and then talks to the baby. Babies learn to take turns even before they are using words. Social interaction is important for language development and turn-taking games are a fun and educational way for babies and young children to learn.
    Young children also need to practice their language skills. Toys that name alphabet letters and everyday words satisfy young children’s need for repetition and rehearsal when practicing words and sounds. For instance, young children can press a button repetitively to hear the same sound or word again. Babies and children learn a lot through repetition and pick up words rapidly in this way. Once children begin to read their vocabulary expands enormously.
Motor Skills
  • Encourages fine motor skill development.
  • An infant’s growth and development in the first year of life is rapid. Many movements that young babies make are in preparation for the next stage of their development. When young babies watch a mobile they are constantly moving their head, arms, legs and even their mouths in response to the movement of the toy. Sound and movement attract a baby’s attention; if a toy is placed almost within reach of babies their movements become more animated. Bath toys provide opportunities to develop and use motor skills to great effect. For example, a young baby has greater control over their leg movements than their arms. You will often see young babies in a bath reaching with their legs towards a floating toy and kicking. All these movements strengthen muscles in readiness for the next stage - walking.
    As babies develop they become more adept at grasping objects. Young infants learn to grasp an object, for instance a cube. The grasping, at first, is quite clumsy but through repetition, and across time, infants become adept at grasping and develop fine motor skills. Infants first use the ulnar grasp where their fingers close against the palm when trying to hold an object. Within another month they are able to move the object from hand to hand. After the first year, infants adopt the ‘pincer grasp’ where they use their thumb and index finger to grasp even very tiny objects. Shape sorters help infants to fine tune their visual perception and hand coordination. Soon infants are building towers with two cubes; this also requires fine coordination skills. As the child grows computer games have been shown to help with hand and eye coordination. Spatial skills can also be enhanced when playing games that require concentration, quick responses and finely tuned motor skills.
Word Building
  • Expands Vocabulary through age appropriate words.
  • In the first year of life infants are exposed to a spoken language but it is rare for them to be able to produce words. Baby sign language helps during this formative period where Infants understand certain words but cannot produce them verbally. Infants use symbolic language when they gesture and can even use a sign to mean a word. There is a gap between how many words babies understand and how many words that they can say. During the second year toddlers begin to produce words and are building their vocabulary; they can be using around 50 words by the middle of their second year. By the time a child is 6 years old they will have an extensive vocabulary of around 10.000 words. They achieve this large vocabulary through practice, repetition and by storing the words in their long term memory. Children learn about 5 new words a day and games and toys can help expand their vocabulary.
    Once a child has learned the meaning of a word it becomes part of their vocabulary; this leads to faster comprehension of text and frees up space in their working memory for new words to be learned. Object and action words are used extensively in younger children’s vocabulary. Toys and games that reflect the types of words that are most common in young children’s vocabulary reinforce learning. Objects, for example ball and table, are often pointed to and named by adults when the child is young. Action words then begin to be used, such as, ‘put the ball on the table’. The next stage in word building is the use of ‘state’ words which are words that modify the noun such as ‘my ball’ or ‘red ball’. Word games are a fun way to reinforce understanding of the pronunciation and meaning of words.
Best for ages:
12 to 36 Months
Highlights
Get playtime on a roll with the interactive Play & Chase Puppy with three ways to play! Learn about numbers and counting with floor play, then get up and dance with this encouraging puppy that turns and rolls along on its hoverboard.
Description
Keep the giggles and gross motor skills growing with a game of follow the leader. Motion sensors let the puppy avoid obstacles and keep it moving forward when someone is following it. Ready to rest? Pick up the pup, and it knows it’s time to slow down. Explore two learning buttons, a light-up heart and an interactive paw button to learn about numbers, counting, music and feelings and to hear encouraging phrases. More than 65 songs, melodies, sounds and phrases help children learn vocabulary words along with lively tunes. Three, two, one, it’s time to have some fun!

Recommended Products

This site uses cookies to store information on your computer.

Some of these cookies are essential, while others help us to improve your experience by providing insights into how the site is being used. For more detailed information on the cookies we use, please see our Cookie Policy.